How To Coach

I’m undertaking a L1 qualification in a new discipline, so I’m going back over the tips on how to be a good coach. Here’s a few of the tips and pointers I’ve come across in part one of the course.

Communication

To be a good coach, you need to be an effective communicator. It’s not just a one way street though, you need to be able to send and receive a message successfully. This includes being aware of potential communication barriers that could prevent your message getting across. To ensure communication is effective, you’ll be wanting to check with questioning and feedback if your communication was effective.

Are you able to get your message across without misunderstanding in a simple, succinct way? Are you able to vary the types of communication you use in order to increase effectiveness and engagement?

There are 3 types of communication: Verbal, Non-verbal and Questions. Some examples of each which you might use in your coaching include:

Verbal- Giving an instruction of what you would like the gymnast to do.

Non-Verbal – Show gymnasts a video demonstration of the skill or technique you are looking for, or employ a ‘Bendy Wendy doll’ (below) to assist!

p-12579-vicki-gymnastics-instruction-doll-blue

Questions – after a demonstration by one performer, question others for feedback and greater understanding of the skill executed.

Communication Barriers

Reasons your communication could be misunderstood or misheard include the environment, a disability, expectations of what is being communicated, attention and the language used to communicate in the first place.

In working with preschoolers I’d assume lack of attention is a significant barrier in a child knowing what you want them to do. It’s too easy to be distracted in a big hall with lots of interesting things to do and play with!

Someone with a disability such as sight loss isn’t going to be able to learn through a demonstration or video, so that’s disabilities should form a key part of your session planning – have you thought of an alternative way form that person to learn?

Using Instructions Effectively

Stop and gain everyone’s attention, outline your Aims, explain What you will be doing, give a reason Why we’re doing it, explain How and Who will be doing it, define When or for how long and Check everyone understood.
Good coaches are good listeners! Don’t just use instructions, define and explain the relevance of an activity – when was the last time your gymnasts were reminded why they warm up?

Don’t make assumptions
Be clear and specific
Give examples and alternatives
Set Boundaries
Combine instructions with different coaching styles

The three main coaching styles utilised in gymnastics are:

  1. Show and tell – ideal when a skill is new or more risky
  2. Set up and stand back – Great for experiementation and gives gymnasts some freedom/ control
  3. Question and involve – A great motivator and encourages thinking and self-development  NB. Open questions are often more useful as coaching tools

Coaching Styles work hand in hand with different Learning Styles. These include: Visual – learning through watching a demonstration. Kinaesthetic – learning through physical practice or experience. Auditory – listening to instructions. Adapt your style to meet not only the needs of the participants but also the requirement of the activity. Most coaches will develop a general style that works in certain situations, but try to vary it a little to keep everyone engaged.

Below are some really good examples about how the language and types of questions we use as coaches can help to better the types of responses we are looking for from an athlete. Examples of Open versus Closed Questions:

Closed: Are you happy with…

Open: How could you have improved…

… your performance today?

Open: What did you enjoy about…

Closed: Did you enjoy…

… today’s session?

Closed: Please can you…

Open: Why do you think we…

… do it this way?

There are times when open questions can be less helpful due to their less specific, abstract nature. If you’ve noticed a specific part of a skill that you would like the participant to think about, you may need to be more specific when referring to it to get the desired response. Specific questions or feedback are best for encouraging thought and encouraging motivation for a positive change. Questions which cater for preschool aged children and individuals with a learning difficulty would be different to those for older children or adults.

Try to include all participants, especially those who are quieter or easily distracted

Take time to practice good listening behaviours

Make a note in your session plan of relevant open questions you might ask participants

If feedback is always positive or always negative the participant can become demotivated

Good feedback should help to reinforce or change what we do – it is most useful with both positives and negatives as well as reflection and planning for next time.

Look for positive outcomes when presented with negative feedback. Give your own feedback in a sandwich- positive, negative, positive.

In the next post: Session Planning and Safety! I hope you’ve found this insightful, and if nothing else, it’ll make a great revision aid for me.

In the meantime, keep bouncing! Bella ~ 😉

 

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